How to get the month name in the IntelliJ copyright velocity template

Every time I try to create a copyright profile in IntelliJ (or PyCharm), I find myself googling around the web trying to find out how to get the month name, e.g. August, into the template. Unfortunately, the IntelliJ documentation is not very helpful by just saying:

IntelliJ documentation about date formatting

In short, it can be done via $today.format("MMMM"), as the DateInfo implements the syntax from java.text.SimpleDateFormat, which has a long list of formatting options:

java.text.SimpleDateFormat formatting options

However, the important part is further below:

Month: If the number of pattern letters is 3 or more, the month is interpreted as text; otherwise, it is interpreted as a number.

  • Letter M produces context-sensitive month names, such as the embedded form of names. Letter M is context-sensitive in the sense that when it is used in the standalone pattern, for example, “MMMM”, it gives the standalone form of a month name and when it is used in the pattern containing other field(s), for example, “d MMMM”, it gives the format form of a month name. For example, January in the Catalan language is “de gener” in the format form while it is “gener” in the standalone form. In this case, “MMMM” will produce “gener” and the month part of the “d MMMM” will produce “de gener”. If a DateFormatSymbols has been set explicitly with constructor SimpleDateFormat(String,DateFormatSymbols) or method setDateFormatSymbols(DateFormatSymbols), the month names given by the DateFormatSymbols are used.
  • Letter L produces the standalone form of month names.

It’s important to use at least 3 letters M to have the month be printed in text form otherwise, you will get the month’s number.

With that in mind, one can now provide a decent copyright profile in IntelliJ, well, to my liking at least, anyway:

Since: $today.format("MMMM") $today.year
Author: $username
Name: $file.fileName
Description: 

Copyright $today.year Gerald Venzl

Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
You may obtain a copy of the License at

    http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0

Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
limitations under the License.

Which generates:

/*
 * Since: January 2022
 * Author: gvenzl
 * Name: Test.java
 * Description:
 *
 * Copyright 2022 Gerald Venzl
 *
 * Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
 * you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
 * You may obtain a copy of the License at
 *
 *     http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
 *
 * Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
 * distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
 * WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
 * See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
 * limitations under the License.
 */

25 years of Java – Happy Birthday!

Birthday cakeToday 25 years ago Java made its first public appearance. Back then, Java promised to be a general-purpose programming language that you “write once, run anywhere“. It came with a new and unique way to compile Java source code down to bytecode, an intermediate representation that could be understood, compiled at runtime and run by the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). It was the combination of Java bytecode and the JVM that made it possible for Java to keep that “write once, run anywhere” promise. The Java Virtual Machine was for Java programs exactly what the name suggests, a (virtual) machine. Regardless of which computer you had, which OS you were running, if you had a JVM installed, you could run your compiled Java program on it without the need for porting or recompiling the program first.

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Oracle Database client libraries for Java now on Maven Central

Oracle has published its Oracle Database JDBC client libraries on Maven Central. From Apache Mavennow on you can find Oracle Database related jar files under the com.oracle.database group id. You will find all libraries from version 11.2.0.4 (e.g. ojdbc6) to 19.3.0 (e.g. ojdbc10).

Going forward, Oracle will use Maven Central as one of the primary distribution mechanisms for Oracle Database Java client libraries, meaning that you will also be able to find new versions of these libraries on Maven Central in the future.

To get the latest Oracle Database JDBC driver, use the following dependency GAV in your Maven POM file:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.oracle.database.jdbc</groupId>
    <artifactId>ojdbc10</artifactId>
    <version>19.3.0.0</version>
</dependency>

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Manually installing a Maven artifact in your local repository

I find myself once again in the situation that I have to install the Oracle JDBC driver into my local Maven repository. Usually this is easily accomplished via mvn install:install-file -Dfile=<path-to-file> -DgroupId=<group-id> -DartifactId=<artifact-id> -Dversion=<version> -Dpackaging=<packaging>, see Guide to installing 3rd party JARs for more details on that. However, this time I was thinking to go the extra mile and actually figure out a way of how to do it entirely manually. This comes in handy if you have, for example, Maven integrated in your IDE and the mvn binary not available to yourself in the command line.

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Java class finding tool: ClassFinder

I got into more coding again lately and that is a good thing I think. I’m a believer of the German saying “Wer rastet, der rostet” or in English: A rolling stone gathers no moss! Java seems to be my main programming language since quite a while now. But believe it or not I’m still coding some PL/SQL as well now and then. Anyway, sometimes when you get some ClassNotFound exceptions in Java it can be quite handy to have a little tool that can scan .jar and .zip files for the class that you’re missing. Yes, there are tons of those little programs out there on the web but as you might have guessed by the title I’ve decided to write yet another class finding tool. Damn, I really should have called it YACFT! But instead I did go for ClassFinder. Why did I write yet another class finding tool then? Well, although there are some good ones out there, non of them fulfilled all of my requirements – at least none of those that I have found. First I was a big fan of Xigole’s classfinder tool. A really slick, fast and easy to use command-line class finding tool which is really great for Unix systems where you ssh in. However, I soon got fed up with it when I did have a proper graphical interface available, whether it was Windows or X11 or simply my MacBook Pro. So I started searching for other tools and soon found that they were either just GUI based or just GUI based and on Windows only (Why? I don’t get it!) or GUI based on ugly AWT. But all that I wanted was a slick tool like Xigole’s that was clever enough to spawn a GUI when there was X11 available but still provide a nice CLI when there wasn’t. Well, as I said I couldn’t find one, so I wrote my own and here it is, ClassFinder:

ClassFinder Window-mode

It’s really easy to use:

  1. Give it either a file or a folder to search – files currently supported are .jar, .war, .ear, .zip, .rar, .class, .java
  2. Give it the class name that you’re looking for
  3. Shall the class name be case sensitive?
  4. Shall the folder be searched recursively?
  5. Hit Search!

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