How to enable auto start/shutdown for Oracle Database 18c Express Edition on Linux

Oracle Database 18c Express Edition can be enabled for automatic startup and shutdown with the Linux operating system. This will not only allow you not to worry about starting and stopping the database but it will also ensure that the database is properly shutdown before the machine is powered off. Enabling auto startup/shutdown is done via two simple commands:

  1. systemctl daemon-reload
  2. systemctl enable oracle-xe-18c

These commands will have to be executed either via the root user or with root privileges:

[root@localhost ~]# systemctl daemon-reload
[root@localhost ~]# systemctl enable oracle-xe-18c
oracle-xe-18c.service is not a native service, redirecting to /sbin/chkconfig.
Executing /sbin/chkconfig oracle-xe-18c on

For more information about starting and stopping Oracle Database XE, have a look at the documentation.

How to install Oracle Database 18c XE on Linux

The new version of the free Oracle Database edition, Oracle Database 18c Express Edition, just got released for Linux 64-bit. Getting started is really simple on Oracle Linux, basically a three step process of downloading the RPM file, installing it and then configuring the database. On other Red Hat  compatible Linux distributions you will also have to download the Oracle Database Preinstall RPM alongside the XE RPM file. Here is a quick guide on how to setup Oracle Database 18c XE.

tl;dr

Oracle Linux

  1. Download the RPM file from Oracle Technology Network
  2. Run “yum -y localinstall oracle-database*18c*
  3. Run “/etc/init.d/oracle-xe-18c configure

Other Red Hat compatible Linux distribution

  1. Download the RPM file from Oracle Technology Network
  2. Download the Oracle Database Preinstall RPM via “curl -o oracle-database-preinstall-18c-1.0-1.el7.x86_64.rpm https://yum.oracle.com/repo/OracleLinux/OL7/latest/x86_64/getPackage/oracle-database-preinstall-18c-1.0-1.el7.x86_64.rpm
  3. Run “yum -y localinstall oracle-database*18c*
  4. Run “/etc/init.d/oracle-xe-18c configure

Continue reading “How to install Oracle Database 18c XE on Linux”

Oracle Database 18c Express Edition is Generally Available!

Oracle just released the new version of Oracle Database Express Edition (XE), a free edition of Oracle Database. This release means something special to me, as I have been closely involved in it and with the great team that brought us Oracle Database 18c XE.

Continue reading “Oracle Database 18c Express Edition is Generally Available!”

Autonomous Database: Creating an Autonomous Data Warehouse Instance

In my previous post I have shown how quick and easy it is to create an Oracle Autonomous Transaction Processing instance. In this post I want to show that the same applies for an Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse, short ADW, instance. As a matter of fact, both services are running on the very same Oracle Autonomous Database infrastructure so you will see that the steps are the very same as with Autonomous Transaction Processing.

Just like with ATP, you can try ADW yourself today via the Oracle Free Cloud Trial.

tl;dr

To create an instance you just have to follow these three simple steps:

  1. Log into the Oracle Cloud Console and choose “Autonomous Data Warehouse” from the menu.
  2. Click “Create Autonomous Data Warehouse
  3. Specify the name, the amount of CPU and storage, the administrator password and hit “Create Autonomous Data Warehouse

Continue reading “Autonomous Database: Creating an Autonomous Data Warehouse Instance”

Autonomous Database: Creating an Autonomous Transaction Processing Instance

In this post I’m going to demonstrate how quick and easy one can create an Autonomous Transaction Processing, short ATP, instance of Oracle’s Autonomous Database Cloud Services. Oracle’s ATP launched on the 7th of August 2018 and is the general purpose flavor of the Oracle Autonomous Database. My colleague SQLMaria (also known as Maria Colgan 😉 ) has already done a great job explaining the difference between the Autonomous Transaction Processing and the Autonomous Data Warehouse services. She has also written another post on what one can expect from Oracle Autonomous Transaction Processing. I highly recommend reading both her articles first for a better understanding of the offerings.

Last but not least, you can try ATP yourself today via the Oracle Free Cloud Trial.

Now let’s get started. Provisioning an ATP service is, as said above, quick and easy.

tl;dr

To create an instance you just have to follow these three simple steps:

  1. Log into the Oracle Cloud Console and choose “Autonomous Transaction Processing” from the menu.
  2. Click “Create Autonomous Transaction Processing
  3. Specify the name, the amount of CPU and storage, the administrator password and hit “Create Autonomous Transaction Processing

Continue reading “Autonomous Database: Creating an Autonomous Transaction Processing Instance”